Tag Archives: Recipero

Starting an internet-based business (businesswings.co.uk)

Recipero has grown out of an idea conceived several years ago, the article referred to below, written by businesswings.co.uk explains well how Recipero’s founder gained inspiration for the fast moving business that it has now become.

Many founders of fast-growing businesses set out with the most modest of intentions.

For example, Pierre Omidyar originally set up eBay as a vehicle for his wife to trade collectables called Pez candy dispensers. Omidyar had no inkling of what the site would become.

Adrian Portlock, whose Gloucestershire-based company Recipero has built an online database comprising the serial numbers of 100 million stolen goods, agrees that this is “often the way with businesses. If you see an opportunity based on providing a solution, that’s normally a good basis for a start-up.”

If you see an opportunity based on providing a solution, that’s normally a good basis for a start-up
One only has to look at some of the ridiculed inventions on Dragon’s Den to see the perils of trying to solve a problem that doesn’t exist (what problem could have give rise to the ironing board that doubled as a piece of lounge furniture?).

Adrian, 50, set up his database, Check Mend, after an irksome experience highlighted a need for such a resource.

“I lost a phone on the Tube in London,” he recalls. “And when I went to the lost-property office they said ‘can you identify the phone?’ So I said ‘a Nokia 6310i.’ And they said ‘well, we’ve only had 35 of those today.’

“Then they wanted an IMEI number, the serial number of the phone. After much messing about my network gave it to me and I managed to get my phone back.

Eureka moment
“It then occurred to me that there was a market for keeping those details somewhere central, so if that if people lost any gizmos they could log in and find them more easily.

“So that’s how it started and it did really well.”

To read the rest of the story please go to:
www.businesswings.co.uk/articles/Starting-an-internet-based-business

Carphone Warehouse expands its use of CheckMEND

Carphone Warehouse Website

As of the 8th June The Carphone Warehouse have extended their trade-in scheme to include iPods and GPS equipment. Every item is checked in real-time on Recipero’s CheckMEND due diligence service.

The system has been integrated with Carphone Warehouse’s EPOS systems in over 800 UK stores, their website, and direct sales channels, allowing them to ensure only ‘bona fide’ customers can benefit from their trade-in offers.

With nearly 50 billion items of serial numbered goods recorded CheckMEND is the world’s largest database of stolen goods, making it an obvious partner for Carphone Warehouse.

For more information please visit the following links:

www.carphonewarehouse.com

www.checkmend.com

www.recipero.com/cpw_expand_checkmend_use

ReportMyLoss wins a birthday award

On the anniversary of its first year of operation, Avon and Somerset Constabulary has just announced that Reportmyloss.com has won an award in this years’ Problem Solving Competition.

The competition serves to recognise initiatives that bring direct and significant improvements in service to the public.

Reportmyloss was introduced by the Force as a quick and effective way to record lost property. It continues to go from strength to strength, with over 70% of the Force’s lost reports being submitted online. The system has helped to reunite thousands of items with their owners and to reduce the numbers of calls to their Force Service Centre.

ReportMyLoss wins Problem Solving Competition
ReportMyLoss wins Problem Solving Competition

For more information about the ReportMyLoss system please go to: www.reportmyloss.com

To visit Avon and Somerset Constabulary please go to: www.avonandsomerset.police.uk

Compulsory registration of mobile phones in the UK

The concept of making everyone register their handset in the UK is greatly misunderstood and is being hyped up by the press. Did you know that any contract mobile phone owner’s information can already be accessed by the Police using either a request under the RIPA or DPA procedures? So why should be people using PAYG phones not be subject to the same system? this is all this is about and it closes a loophole used by criminals that make it harder for the Police to identify stolen handsets or handsets used in connection with dubious activities. The only argument surely is whether the owner’s information is subject to the safeguards afforded by RIPA. If you use the DVLA registration of cars as a proof of concept, the Police can tap in your registration number and see the owner’s details in a heartbeat without having to make any formal requests so why not do the same with mobile phones?